Tunisia Tourism Articles & Analysis

Chapter | Tourism from The Report: Tunisia 2019

With heightened security measures raising tourist confidence and a weak dinar making holidays in Tunisia increasingly attractive, the tourism sector is seeing a renaissance. However, in order for this growth to be sustainable, investment is needed to modernise and improve supporting infrastructure. Furthermore, most historic or cultural sites require a significant influx of restoration funds...

Tunisia has successfully navigated the difficulties of the post-revolutionary period by capably establishing robust democratic institutions. However, the country faces macroeconomic challenges since the 2011 revolution. Budgetary pressures, combined with a devaluation of the dinar and a rise in the level of business informality, have made the current environment a complex one.

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What is being done to develop the tourism sector?

 

Aided by easier and cheaper travel, global tourism has experienced two decades of almost uninterrupted growth. According to the World Bank, the number of international departures more than doubled between 1997 and 2017, from 687m to 1.57bn per annum. With the global middle class estimated by the US-based think tank Brookings Institution to be...

 

Tunisia has over 1200 km of coastline to the north and east, and is bordered by desert and oasis to the west, allowing it to enjoy a mild Mediterranean climate. With over 30,000 archaeological sites around the country, it offers a wide array of tourism options.

 

Tunisia has a long and illustrious history of craftsmanship, boasting some 76 craft specialities, including pottery, weaving, tapestry, embroidery, basketry and jewellery-making. The industry, which sells its goods primarily to tourists in the country’s traditional souqs (shops or boutiques), was significantly impacted by the slump in...

Tunisia has successfully navigated the difficulties of the post-revolutionary period by capably establishing robust democratic institutions. However, the country faces macroeconomic challenges since the 2011 revolution. Budgetary pressures, combined with a devaluation of the dinar and a rise in the level of business informality, have made the current environment a complex one.

Une sécurité renforcée a contribué à mettre le secteur touristique tunisien sur la voie de la reprise, celui-ci enregistrant une croissance à deux chiffres du nombre d’arrivées au cours des deux dernières années, même si l’évolution des recettes s’effectue à un rythme moins soutenu que celle du nombre de visiteurs.