• Construction

    OBG’s Construction sector analysis highlights investment opportunities in the infrastructure, residential, commercial and industrial segments. Government policies are reviewed along with labour, materials and land costs, trends in bank lending and the public tendering process.
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In 2008, for the first time in history, more than half of humanity was living in urban areas. Perhaps the most remarkable observation about this trend is the speed at which it has happened: as recently as 1900 urban areas accounted for 13% of the global population. Towns and cities are seen as the crucibles of opportunity for many rural...

 

The residential real estate market has experienced fluctuations through the boom and bust cycles. During the 1990s and into the 2000s, buoyed by high energy prices and large amounts of foreign direct investment (FDI), there was a corresponding increase in property development. As a result, the prices of homes rose by more than 400% from 1991...

 

Upon assuming office in 2015, the administration of Prime Minister Keith Rowley announced its intention to reintroduce legislation to put into effect the collection of property tax in Trinidad and Tobago. This would build upon steps taken by the previous administration to reformulate the mechanism utilised to calculate and collect property...

 

Although the sector has a long and successful history in Trinidad and Tobago, construction remains heavily dependent on government spending. Partly due to a number of large-scale projects reaching or nearing completion, the sector’s economic performance has contracted in recent years, with negative growth of 1.6% in 2015, 5.2% in 2016 and 4.8...

 

What major developments can we expect to see from the sector in the short to medium term?

Chapter | Construction & Real Estate from The Report: Trinidad & Tobago 2018

The construction sector has the potential to satisfy the housing demands of Trinbagonians, improve the transport infrastructure and support economic growth over the long term. Local professionals have been largely responsible for the built environment of Trinidad and Tobago until recently, and the domestic sector still has strong potential to develop local capabilities outside T...