Qatar Construction Articles & Analysis

Chapter | Construction from The Report: Qatar 2019

Qatar’s construction industry has flourished over the past five years to become a key engine of the economy. Although activity remains robust, the wider economic squeeze brought about by the 2014-16 oil glut has been felt in the sector, as the effects of lower oil and gas revenue trickled down to impact government expenditure and investor confidence. A narrower project pipeline and increased...

Its relatively small population and status as the world’s biggest gas exporter have helped Qatar become the richest country globally in terms of GDP per capita, which stood at $72,700 at current prices in 2019, according to IMF estimates. In recent years, however, the nation has faced strong economic headwinds from a drop in global energy prices to a diplomatic blockade.

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What sectors of the economy are prioritised for infrastructure spending in 2019?

 

Driven by government infrastructure spending related to Qatar National Vision 2030 and the upcoming 2022 FIFA World Cup, Qatar’s construction industry has flourished over the past five years to become a key engine of the economy. The laying of new rail and metro lines, a growing airport and port, and a rapidly expanding road network have...

 

In its Qatar National Vision 2030 development plan, the country has identified infrastructure building as key to engendering “a dynamic and more diversified economy”. Added to this long-term outlook is the impetus created by hosting the 2022 FIFA World Cup, during which athletes and spectators from around the world will play in Qatar’s...

 

In 2008, for the first time in history, more than half of humanity was living in urban areas. Perhaps the most remarkable observation about this trend is the speed at which it has happened: as recently as 1900 urban areas accounted for 13% of the global population. Towns and cities are seen as the crucibles of opportunity for many rural...

Its relatively small population and status as the world’s biggest gas exporter have helped Qatar become the richest country globally in terms of GDP per capita, which stood at $72,700 at current prices in 2019, according to IMF estimates. In recent years, however, the nation has faced strong economic headwinds from a drop in global energy prices to a diplomatic blockade.

Rising demand for hard infrastructure in Qatar is providing more opportunities for local construction firms, with smaller-scale businesses set to be key beneficiaries of nationwide development projects.