Jordan Energy Articles & Analysis

Chapter | Energy from The Report: Jordan 2018

Dependent on imports and grappling with regional instability and major supply disruptions, Jordan’s energy sector has faced several challenging years. Rapid population growth – with the kingdom seeing an estimated 1.3m Syrian refugees arrive since 2011 – has also exacerbated existing water scarcity, especially in Amman and Jordan’s northern areas. These challenges have prompted the government...

As ongoing volatility continues to hamper growth in the region, Jordan has made significant progress in preserving macroeconomic stability and reducing its fiscal deficit in the past few years. Efforts to the fulfill the stipulations of a $723m extended fund facility agreement with the IMF continue, and the government may need to pursue more widespread reforms to increase income tax revenues and limit tax avoidance so as to sustain recent momentum.

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In June 2015 the Ministry of Water and Irrigation (MoWI) launched the National Water Strategy (NWS) 2016-25, which aims to reduce costs and boost annual water supply by 550m cu metres through exploration, drilling and infrastructure investment. The Red Sea Dead Sea Conveyance (RSDS) project is one of the main projects under the plan; however,...

 

How will the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Programme serve to further develop and grow Jordan’s green economy?

 

Solar power is set to play an important role in helping achieve Jordan’s goal of having renewables meet 10% of its energy needs by 2020. Regional volatility and a lack of hydrocarbon reserves spurred the government to develop one of the most comprehensive policy frameworks for renewable energy projects in the Middle East.

 

Dependent on imports and grappling with regional instability and major supply disruptions, Jordan’s energy sector has faced several challenging years. Rapid population growth, which includes the kingdom absorbing an estimated 1.3m Syrian refugees since 2011, has exacerbated existing water scarcity, especially in the northern region of Jordan...

As ongoing volatility continues to hamper growth in the region, Jordan has made significant progress in preserving macroeconomic stability and reducing its fiscal deficit in the past few years. Efforts to the fulfill the stipulations of a $723m extended fund facility agreement with the IMF continue, and the government may need to pursue more widespread reforms to increase income tax revenues and limit tax avoidance so as to sustain recent momentum.

Despite high levels of government debt and the costs associated with hosting hundreds of thousands of refugees, Jordan’s economy has continued to demonstrate remarkable resilience in the face of ongoing regional instability. A raft of far-reaching reforms introduced in 2016, along with newly brokered international agreements, should help the kingdom continue along its slow but steady growth path in the years ahead.