Next Frontier: OBG Editors' Blog

Thoughts and Insights on the yellow slice of the pie

Next Frontier: OBG Editors Blog | Emerging Markets Economics Blog

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Next Frontier: OBG Editors' Blog
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Thoughts and Insights on the yellow slice of the pie
Posts in slideshow: 
Ghana’s Economy Rebounds, Strengthening Sentiment among CEOs
Business Getting Easier in Indonesia, but CEOs Wary of External Risks
Increasing Opportunities: Latin American Economies Set for Growth in 2018
OBG Roundtable 2018: Keys to Enhancing Peruvian Exports
CEOs in Nigeria Indicate First Steps to Long Overdue Economic Recovery
Exerting Resilience: Peru Rebounds from Challenges to Post Positive Growth
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Patrick Cooke
11 June 2018
OBG Business Barometer

Papua New Guinea’s chairmanship of APEC in 2018 comes at a time when the Pacific Island nation is still grappling with a foreign exchange shortage and high public debt, as well as persistent problems with law and order.

Patrick Cooke
11 June 2018
OBG Business Barometer

Papua New Guinea’s chairmanship of APEC in 2018 comes at a time when the nation is still grappling with a foreign exchange shortage and high public debt, as well as persistent problems with law and order. Despite these issues, C-suite executives appear optimistic for 2018, as shown by the more than 100 participants in Oxford Business Group’s second Business Barometer: PNG CEO Survey. The vast majority (77%) think that the APEC 2018 summit will have a positive or very positive effect on the economy.

Jaime Perez-Seoane de Zunzunegui
6 June 2018
OBG Business Barometer

With the Argentine peso in free fall, the beginning of May was a tumultuous time for the country. Even though the central bank continued to sell its reserves and raise interest rates, the depreciation of the currency appeared unstoppable.