• ICT

    OBG’s coverage of the telecoms sector looks at market structure, regulatory framework, government goals, foreign participation and the roll-out of new technologies. Our ICT analysis reviews hardware and software markets, corporate spending, national bandwidth and government support.
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The rise of Tunisia’s ICT sector forms part of the government’s drive to make science and technology the focus of its economic transformation, diversifying from traditional sectors such as tourism, manufacturing and agriculture. While government policies are organised under the sector’s national plan, Digital Tunisia 2020, the private sector...

 

Internet services are playing an increasingly important role in supporting economic growth and social development across the world. In line with this trend, Tunisia’s ICT sector continued to grow in 2018. The country already has sophisticated telecoms and broadband infrastructure in place, which is quickly evolving to support the ongoing...

 

More and more commercial transactions are moving online and the so-called digital economy continues to expand its reach into every facet of the traditional analogue economy. For businesses this means they have access to new channels to reach existing clients as well as new opportunities to expand market share with a competitive digital...

Chapter | ICT & Innovation from The Report: Tunisia 2019

With rising mobile usage rates and ongoing improvements to telecoms infrastructure, the expansion of digital services is opening up new opportunities for Tunisia’s economic growth. In order for the sector to transition from an underserved market to a central driver of socio-economic development, the government has a vital role to play. As the largest customer for e-services, the public sector...

Tunisia has successfully navigated the difficulties of the post-revolutionary period by capably establishing robust democratic institutions. However, the country faces macroeconomic challenges since the 2011 revolution. Budgetary pressures, combined with a devaluation of the dinar and a rise in the level of business informality, have made the current environment a complex one.

 

The country’s call for a third telecoms player stems from low competition and underinvestment in the industry, beginning with the more than 65-year monopoly held by PLDT. The stipulations required of the third provider are expected to see all players increase coverage rates, improve mobile internet speeds and offer more attractive packages....