Papua New Guinea Agriculture

Chapter | Agriculture & Fisheries from The Report: Papua New Guinea 2019

Prime Minister James Marape is intent on putting agriculture, forestry and fisheries at the forefront of the government’s development agenda, with an eye to boost downstream processing of farmed resources. As attempts to galvanise the sector spur the development of Papua New Guinea’s key crops and catches, reforms are under way to ensure the country maximises the potential of its rich soil and...

Efforts to improve public governance are gradually bolstering confidence in Papua New Guinea’s economy, despite national performance being heavily dependent on the extractive industries. Backed by macroeconomic development plans, Prime Minister James Marape’s administration is seeking to improve debt management, reduce foreign exchange imbalances, widen access to social services and provide greater employment opportunities.

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Papua New Guinea confirmed its first case of Covid-19 on March 20, involving a foreign mine worker in Morobe Province. This prompted the government to declare a two-week state of emergency commencing March 24, which has since been extended by two months.

Papua New Guinea’s efforts to strengthen agriculture’s position as a major economic driver have been given a boost following the much-anticipated launch of a series of new projects.

In what ways can Papua New Guinea move closer to food security and self-sufficiency?

Prime Minister James Marape is intent on putting agriculture, forestry and fisheries at the forefront of the government’s development agenda, with an eye to boost downstream processing of farmed resources. As attempts to galvanise the sector spur the development of Papua New Guinea’s key crops and catches, reforms are under way to ensure the country maximises the potential of...

Papua New Guinea’s efforts to establish special economic zones (SEZs) began in 2000 with the passing of the Free Trade Zones Act. However, PNG has yet to develop its first SEZ due to conflicts between the central and provincial governments, resulting in policy inconsistency and land disputes. For example, in February 2018 Allan Bird, governor of East Sepik Province, issued a...

Global food demand is expected to increase by anywhere between 59% to 98% by 2050. However, global freshwater resources are already overstretched due to climate change and soaring population growth, and it is unclear how agricultural production will keep up with these challenges. In recent years climate-induced water shortages in urban areas have brought water scarcity to the...

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