Mongolia Construction

Displaying 19 - 24 of 39

The sector has been moving from a state-owned and -controlled industry to one driven by for-profit firms for the past two decades. However, this transition has been complicated by the challenges of extreme climate, a shortage of trained workers and logistical obstacles preventing the establishment of a steady flow of low-cost and on-time materials...

The cement sector features characteristics common to so many markets in the country’s economy: short supply, mushrooming demand, Chinese imports and plans to boost local capacity. The importance of new domestic supply cannot be understated, as the government’s plans in the next five years include $40.5bn in spending on major projects in energy,...

Thanks to a shortage of supply, Mongolia’s real estate sector is likely to feature fast-rising rents, land values and sales prices for at least the next several years and perhaps more. The market is highly focused on the capital city, Ulaanbaatar, which is under pressure due to a speedy rate of urbanisation; supply constraints due to capacity,...

What can be done to make affordable housing projects viable for the government and developers?

Ulaanbaatar is the only city in Mongolia with more than 100,000 people, but opportunities outside the capital city are in many cases as attractive as those within its borders. Towns that have until now been sleepy frontier outposts are set for a transformation thanks to the mining sector – labour demands at the mines will mean the need for housing,...

While a significant nomadic population still pushes its herds across the steppe, young adults in Ulaanbaatar use fibre-optic networks to access the internet. Heir to the legacy of Chinggis Khan, Mongolia is fast emerging as a land rich with economic potential – a country that is seeking growth while also working to preserve its unique national culture.