Mongolia Agriculture Articles & Analysis

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While mining and minerals represent the key to Mongolia’s future growth and wealth, agriculture is also a vital part of the economy. The sector, which involves the raising of livestock for both meat and wool, and to a lesser extent the cultivation of grains and vegetables, has the biggest impact on the lives of average Mongolians. Imported consumer...

For years following the collapse of the Soviet Union, Mongolia pursued a relatively hands-off approach to agriculture. To a certain extent, this was just another element of reform, part and parcel with the end of centralisation. It was also a practical choice. The country is too big, and at the time too poor, to micromanage from the capital. The...

With approximately one head of cattle per person, 10 sheep and/or goats per capita, and a clean, healthy environment perfect for organic farming, Mongolia is in a good position not only to feed itself but to sell superior, high-grade, hormone- and antibiotic-free meat. The country has the potential to go from a marginal supplier of low-grade...

What are the difficulties in raising farming output?

While a significant nomadic population still pushes its herds across the steppe, young adults in Ulaanbaatar use fibre-optic networks to access the internet. Heir to the legacy of Chinggis Khan, Mongolia is fast emerging as a land rich with economic potential – a country that is seeking growth while also working to preserve its unique national culture. 

Mongolia is bracing itself for a colder-than-average winter following a harvest that, while strong, failed to meet agricultural targets. Severe weather conditions are raising fears of a dzud, otherwise known as a summer drought and severe winter, which in previous years decimated Mongolia’s herds and sent agricultural output spiralling.