• Economic Reports from Oxford Business Group

    Country Reports

    Since 1994, OBG has been at the frontier of mapping new waves of emerging economies. OBG now operates in many of the world's fastest growing markets, offering internationally acclaimed intelligence on regions that are shaping the future balance of economic power.

Displaying 7 to 12 of 56 published reports

Located at a juncture between Africa, the Middle East and Asia, Djibouti has easy access to international trade routes via the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea, and borders fast-growing yet landlocked Ethiopia, making it an ideal continental hub. New ports, railway links and road improvement projects are enhancing economic efficiencies and providing a solid platform to bolster expansion in sectors.

While Kenya is no stranger to political strides experienced across the region, the country has managed to avoid long periods of crisis – whether political, economic or social – and has been able to overcome its challenges in relatively short periods of time.

One of East Africa’s largest economies and most popular tourist destinations, Tanzania is reputed for its stability in the region. Its extractive wealth, favourable climate for agriculture, and natural assets such as Mount Kilimanjaro and the Serengeti National Park have helped it build a relatively high rate of growth over the last decade, averaging 6-7% per year.

Tunisia is working to gradually improve its economic indicators by means of tough yet necessary structural reforms. Although significant strides have been made since 2011, the country continues to face acute macroeconomic imbalances, while coincident reforms have suffered from changing administrations in the years following the revolution, negatively affecting economic growth.

Côte d’Ivoire has seen rapid growth since a decade-long bout of civil unrest ended in 2011, registering an average GDP growth rate of 9.3% in the five years to 2016. By far the biggest economy in the UEMOA and the third largest in ECOWAS, the IMF expects GDP expansion in the West African nation to be sustained, forecasting growth of above 7% through to 2019.

As Egypt enters 2018, a newly liberalised local currency and the recent implementation of a much-anticipated investment framework have left the country well positioned for continued economic expansion: the IMF expects GDP growth to reach 4.5% in 2018 and accelerate to around 6% over the medium term.